How to remove ‘Google’ from the Gboard Spacebar

A recent update to the Google Keyboard Gboard has added the word ‘Google’ to the keyboard spacebar at the bottom. I personally didn’t like this addition to the app and at present, I cannot find a way to disable it in the latest version.

There is however a solution to this problem, you can roll back your Gboard app to stock and not update it again. Beware that it will reset your keyboard settings in doing so (such as the theme).

To do this,

  1. Open the Play Store app.
  2. Swipe in from the left and choose ‘Settings’.
  3. Select ‘Auto-update apps’ and choose ‘Don’t auto-update apps’.
  4. Select Done.
  5. Go back to the Play Store main page.
  6. Search for ‘Gboard’ and select ‘Gboard – the Google Keyboard’.
  7. Then select ‘Uninstall’ to roll it back to stock.
  8. Viola. You shouldn’t have ‘Google’ on your spacebar anymore.

Unless you have a custom ROM your app should go back to the factory version that came with the phone. If for some reason that uninstalls the keyboard completely for you, you may wish to download an older build from a respectable location. I can confirm that the version I am currently using is 8.3.6.250752527-release-arm64-v8a26830614 and it’s not present for my OnePlus3 but I imagine the releases are hardly innovative as keyboards tend to go.

That should be all you need to remove the word ‘Google’ from your android keyboard spacebar, you could also install another keyboard if you particularly wanted to.

Early High-Level Programming Languages

In the 1950s and 1960s, there was innovation in the field of computer programming and design. Computers were becoming commercially available and starting to gain widespread interest. In 1951 to Univac 1 was the first commercially available computer for example.

FORTRAN

In 1957 came about FORTRAN. FORTRAN was considered one of the first high-level programs to really gain popularity. Its design was suited for high performance when programmed and could perform code optimization to improve the performance of programmers’ instructions. It was ‘Formula Translating’ and its success saw it spread to other computers early on.

Fortran was built for number crunching and computing. Its implementations were widespread and its general-purpose capabilities saw use in many scientific fields of research. Fortran was produced over a series of years under different versions with compatibility for previous versions in many cases. It was by modern-day standards considered low level but no doubt was formulative for other modern-day languages, it included features like code comments, input-output handling and one of the first do loops. FORTRAN has many versions and is still used today.

ALGOL

ALGOL was developed around the same time as Fortran, it was designed for more ‘Algorithmic’ purpose. ALGOL 58 was considered a prototype version named IAL (International Algebraic Language) and was soon superseded by ALGOL 60. It was designed to be more human-readable and could be used to design algorithms and unlike Fortran, it was not designed to be hardware-specific to be the fastest but relied on the best implementations they thought were suitable. Although not as popular as Fortran, many modern languages have features present in ALGOL first, such as IF ELSE statements and dynamic arrays defined at run time.